Hiroshima – John Hersey’s book is essential reading

On his way back with the water, he got lost on a detour around a fallen tree, and as he looked for his way through the woods, he heard a voice ask from the underbrush, ‘Have you anything to drink?’ He saw a uniform. Thinking there was just one soldier, he approached with the water. When he had penetrated the bushes, he saw there were about twenty men, and they were all in exactly the same nightmarish state: their faces were wholly burned, their melted eyesockets were hollow, the fluid from their melted eyes had run down their cheeks. (They must have had their faces upturned when the bomb went off; perhaps they were anti-aircraft personnel.) Their mouths were mere swollen, pus-covered wounds, which they could not bear to stretch enough to admit the spout of the teapot. So Father Kleinsorge got a large piece of grass and drew out the stem so as to make a straw, and gave them all water to drink that way. One of them said, ‘I can’t see anything.’ Father Kleinsorge answered as cheerfully as he could. ‘There’s a doctor at the entrance to the park. He’s busy now, but he’ll come soon and fix your eyes, I hope.’
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The miniature people who live in our hair

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These little people converse
Among the strands of your hair
And speak night and day about its properties;
Strengths, limpnesses, waywardness, weakness,
They have no hair on their bodies or heads
But they know everything there is to know about every strand present or long disappeared
Tonight in your dreams you might meet them
They will tell you everything you think you want to know about your scalp
This is their expertise